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Isaac Mathis

Isaac Mathis, a son of Isham Mathis and Priscilla Jeffs, was born in Guileford Country, North Carolina, about 1795. Little is known of his boyhood. When the war of 1812 began, he was anxious to volunteer. He was too young to do so, but that didn’t dampen his spirits or decrease his desire to serve. In the summer of 1814, he ran away from home and made his way to Tennessee. In Dickson County he enlisted as a private in Captain Francis S. Ellis’ Company of Infantry, Second Cock’s Tennessee Militia. He was in the Battle of New Orleans. This was the turning point in the war, and so on May 13, 1816, he received his discharge. He went back to his home in North Carolina, where he worked on his father’s plantation.

On February 22, 1922, he married Elizabeth Ross, who lived with her parents on their plantation in the same county of Guileford, North Carolina. They moved back into Tennessee, moving from one county to another. During these moves, then children were born to them; two dying in infancy.

In 1851, they moved to Pottawatonic County in Iowa, where they made preparations to come over the pioneer trail to the West. They spent a few years making these preparations for this journey, so that they would have good outfits when the time came for them to make the journey. In the spring of 1852, they were on their way.

Everything went well until cholera broke out. The disease seemed to be in its worst form. Nearly everyone who took sick died from it. Graves were scattered along the way. People became afraid of it so that when death came, the victim was buried as quickly as possible and the company moved on.

On July 22, 1852, they camped at Elm Creek near Fort Laramie in Wyoming. During this night, Isaac became very ill and before morning he had passed away. He left a wife and eight children to make their way to the destination of the Saints, and there to provide for themselves as best they could.

***

Another version:

Isaac Benjamin Mathis a son of Isham and Priscilla Jeffs was born in Guilford County, North Carolina about 1795.  Little is known of his boyhood.  When the war of 1812 began, he was anxious to volunteer.  He was too young to do that, but that didn’t dampen his spirits or decrease his desire to be in the service.  In the summer of 1814 he ran away from home and made his way to Tennessee.  In Dickson County he enlisted as a private in Captain Francis S. Ellis Company of infantry, 2nd Cook’s Tennessee Militia.  He was in the Battle of New Orleans.  This was the turning point in the war and on 13 March 1815 he received his discharge.  He went back to his home in North Carolina where he worked on his father’s plantation.

On 22 February 1822 he married Elizabeth Ross who lived with her parents on their plantation in the same county of Guilford, North Carolina.  They moved back into Tennessee, moving from one county to another.  During these moves, ten children were born to them; two of them died in their infancy.

Then the gospel of the Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints found them and accepted it and began the struggle, which was incident to the early Church history.

By 1851 they moved to Pottawattamie County in Iowa where they spent a few years making the preparations for the journey so that they would have good outfits when the time afforded for them to make the trip.  In the spring of 1862 they were well on their way.

Everything went well until the cholera broke out.  The disease seemed to be in its worst form.  Nearly every body that took it died.  Graves were scattered along the way.  People became so afraid of it that when death came the victim was buried as quickly as possible and the company moved on.

On 22 July 1862 they camped at Elm Creek near Fort Laramie in Wyoming.  During the night Isaac was ill and before morning he had passed away.  He left a wife and eight children to make their way to the destination of the Saints and there provide for themselves as best they could.

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1 thought on “Isaac Mathis”

  1. Thank you for sharing this family history information. I found several histories of my ancestors that I had been looking for.

    Like

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